Thursday, February 18, 2016

Colloquium "Transcreation: Intersections of Culture and Commerce in Japanese Translation and Localization" at Pitt, February 19.

The University of Pittsburgh's Department of East Asian Languages & Literatures will host M.A. candidate Dylan Reilly and his colloquium "Transcreation: Intersections of Culture and Commerce in Japanese Translation and Localization" on Friday, February 19. The abstract:
This study looks at text-heavy examples of translated Japanese popular media, such as recent video games and manga (Japanese comics) to explore the recent evolution of Japanese-English translation and localization methods. While acknowledging localization’s existence as a facet of the larger concept of translation itself, the work examines “translation” and “localization” as if they were two ends of a spectrum; through this contrast, the unique techniques and goals of each method as seen in translated media can be more effectively highlighted. After establishing these working definitions, they can then be applied as a rubric to media examples to determine which “translative” or “localizing” techniques were employed in the translation process. The media examples chosen as case studies for this examination were selected on the merits of their specific interplays of “translative” and “localizing” factors, such as cultural authenticity versus commercial palatability, the values of unofficial translation versus official localization, and the impact of globalization on what is or is not “translatable.” Ultimately, the goal of this project is not only to shed light on the varied motivations and methods of translating Japanese media, but to potentially provide a frame of reference for new efforts in bringing Japanese media to English-speaking shores: once these techniques have been clarified, they can be synthesized in novel ways to create more effective translations – or localizations – in the future.
The talk will be held in 4130 Posvar Hall (map) from 12:00 pm, and is free and open to the public.

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