Showing posts with label Sports. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sports. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Chinese program at Win-Win Kung Fu in Squirrel Hill, from September 11; free trial class on September 4.

Squirrel Hill's Win-Win Kung Fu Culture Center will resume its Chinese-language program from September 4.
A free trial class is given to kick the program off:

Date and time: Saturday September 4th at 2:40-3:30 pm

Starting Saturday September 11th, 2021, the class will be held every Saturday 2:40-3:30 pm, mixed with kids and adults.

Fees: $5 each class for current students, $10 for non-students.
Those interested can visit or contact the center. Win-Win Kung Fu is located at 2705-2707 Murray Ave. (map).

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Yoshitomo Tsutsugo hits third home run, becomes new home run king among Japanese Pittsburgh Pirates.


Yoshitomo Tsutsugo hit his third home run of the season on Monday, and his third home run of his Pittsburgh Pirates career, setting a new high mark among Japanese-born players in team history. Tsutsugo was signed on August 15th, and is the fourth Japanese player in team history after pitcher Masumi Kuwata in 2007, infielder Akinori Iwamura in 2010, and pitcher Hisanori Takahashi for nine games in 2012.

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Yoshitomo Tsutsugo debuts for Pirates.

via Japan Times, Reuters.

Yoshitomo Tsutsugo made his Pittsburgh Pirates debut on Monday against the Los Angeles Dodgers, getting a pinch hit in his ninth inning plate appearance. Tsutsugo was signed on Sunday after spending parts of two seasons in the Major Leagues. By making his debut with the team, he is now officially the fourth Japanese player in Pittsburgh Pirates history, and the first in nearly a decade, after pitcher Masumi Kuwata in 2007, infielder Akinori Iwamura in 2010, and pitcher Hisanori Takahashi for nine games in 2012.

Monday, August 16, 2021

Pittsburgh Pirates sign Yoshitomo Tsutsugo.


The Pittsburgh Pirates signed first baseman Yoshitomo Tsutsugo (筒香 嘉智) on Sunday, August 15.
Tsutsugo has had an interesting road to this point. The utility man, who has played both corner infield spots and in left field in his career, was a highly-coveted power hitter in Japan. In 2016, as a 24-year-old with the Yokohama Bay Stars, he mashed 44 homers, then followed that up with 28, 38 and 29 homer seasons over the next three years. Since 2014, his lowest OPS in a season with Yokohama was .900.

That drew attention from MLB teams, and he eventually signed with the Tampa Bay Rays on a two-year, $12 million deal in December 2019. He never caught on against MLB pitching, though. In 2020, he slashed .197/.314/.395 in 51 games during the COVID-19-shortened season. He did hit eight home runs, which was tied for the second-most long balls on the team.
He played for the Rays and LA Dodgers this season. Should he play in a regular-season game, he will be the fourth Japanese player in team history, after pitcher Masumi Kuwata in 2007, infielder Akinori Iwamura in 2010, and pitcher Hisanori Takahashi for nine games in 2012.

Tuesday, August 10, 2021

Hoy Jun Park hits first Major League home run tonight.


Hoy Jun Park (박효준) hit his first Major League home run tonight in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals. Park was acquired last month from the New York Yankees and has played regularly, and at multiple positions, since being recalled to the team on August 1. He is the third Korean in team history to make the Pirates regular season roster.

Documentary The Witches of the Orient, on Japanese women's volleyball team in the 50s and 60s, online via Row House Cinema through August 14.


The Row House Cinema will continue to present the 2021 documentary The Witches of the Orient online through August 14.
How does a Japanese women’s volleyball team from the late 1950s become an international sensation, feminist role models, the subject of a wildly popular comic book and a still-influential anime?

This stranger-than-fiction story is dynamically told by Julien Faraut (JOHN McENROE: IN THE REALM OF PERFECTION), with an ironic twist on the original demeaning moniker, Oriental Witches. A group of Osaka textile workers are transformed into a fiercely competitive volleyball team by their astonishingly ruthless coach whose unconventional techniques emphasize speed and aggression. A record-setting winning streak and a dramatic 1964 Tokyo Olympics triumph follow. Wonderful archival footage of the women in training and on the court, animated versions of their championship games, and moving interviews with the women today are set to a pulsating electronic score.
Viewing information is available online, and a portion of proceeds benefit the single-screen theater in Lawrenceville.

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Hoy Jun Park debuts for Pirates, becoming third Korean in team history.


via Chosun Ilbo
Hoy Jun Park debuted for the Pittsburgh Pirates today, going 1 for 4 and becoming the third Korean to play for the Pittsburgh Pirates in team history. Park was acquired last week from the New York Yankees and made his first MLB start today at shortstop. He is the third Korean to play for the Pirates, after Chan-ho Park in 2010 and Jung-ho Kang from 2015 through 2019, though the Pirates have had several other Korean prospects and players in their system over the last three decades.

"Hoy" is how his name has been romanized, though the Korean corresponds to "Hyo" (효). Though I don't know the details of Park's name, inconsistencies like this do sometimes happen if a family member makes a mistake applying for a passport. A Korean-language wiki, referring to another uncited article, claims the change was intentional when creating his passport in order to make it easier for non-Koreans to pronounce.

Pittsburgh Pirates promote infielder Hoy Jun Park (박효준), will be third Korean in Pirates history to make Major League roster.


On Saturday, the Pittsburgh Pirates recalled Hoy Jun Park (박효준), who was acquired in a July 26 trade with the New York Yankees. When Park plays in a game he will be third Korean in Pirates history to play in a Major League game, behind Chan-ho Park in 2010 and Jung-ho Kang from 2015 through 2019, though the Pirates have had several other Korean prospects and players in their system over the decades.

"Hoy" is how his name has been romanized, though the Korean corresponds to "Hyo" (효). Though I don't know the details of Park's name, inconsistencies like this do sometimes happen if a family member makes a mistake applying for a passport.

Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Pittsburgh Pirates acquire Korean infielder Hoy Jun Park (박효준).


The Pittsburgh Pirates have acquired Hoy Jun Park (박효준), along with Diego Castillo, in a trade with the New York Yankees for Clay Holmes. He appeared in one game for the Yankees this year as a rookie, and has been playing well in the minors, if baseball experts are to be believed. If Park makes the Major League roster, he will be the third Korean in Pittsburgh Pirates history, after Chan-ho Park in 2010 and Jung-ho Kang from 2015 through 2019, though the Pirates have had several other Korean prospects and players in their system over the decades.

"Hoy" is how his name has been romanized, though the Korean corresponds to "Hyo" (효). Though I don't know the details of Park's name, inconsistencies like this do sometimes happen if a family member makes a mistake applying for a passport.

Documentary The Witches of the Orient, on Japanese women's volleyball team in the 50s and 60s, online via Row House Cinema from July 30.


The Row House Cinema will present the 2021 documentary The Witches of the Orient online from July 30.
How does a Japanese women’s volleyball team from the late 1950s become an international sensation, feminist role models, the subject of a wildly popular comic book and a still-influential anime?

This stranger-than-fiction story is dynamically told by Julien Faraut (JOHN McENROE: IN THE REALM OF PERFECTION), with an ironic twist on the original demeaning moniker, Oriental Witches. A group of Osaka textile workers are transformed into a fiercely competitive volleyball team by their astonishingly ruthless coach whose unconventional techniques emphasize speed and aggression. A record-setting winning streak and a dramatic 1964 Tokyo Olympics triumph follow. Wonderful archival footage of the women in training and on the court, animated versions of their championship games, and moving interviews with the women today are set to a pulsating electronic score.
It will be available to rent and view online from the 30th, with a portion of proceeds benefitting the single-screen theater in Lawrenceville.

Sunday, April 11, 2021

"Win-Win Kung Fu Culture Center 2021 Summer Kung Fu Culture Program" in July and August.

Squirrel Hill's Win-Win Kung Fu Culture Center will host a 2021 Summer Kung Fu Culture Program this July and August.

Win-Win Kung Fu Culture Center

 

2021 Summer Kung Fu Culture Program

 

Squirrel Hill Studio

2705-2707 Murray Avenue

Pittsburgh, PA 15217

 

Learn kung fu with champion masters!

Learn Chinese language, Chinese culture and more!

 

 

Register Now!

 

Register by May 31st to get $30 off weekly tuition!

 

 

Benefits of Win-Win Kung Fu Summer Intensive Program

 

Major

 

  • Learn Kung Fu, free style Chinese kickboxing (sanda) and other forms of Chinese martial arts and Chinese language daily, with strong emphasis on the basics.
  • Focus greatly on exercise and conditioning and gain skills needed for other sports and activities as well.
  • Improve your concentration and focus with authentic Chinese martial arts training.
  • Boot camp for beginners
  • Intensive training for intermediate and advanced Wushu as well as a boot camp for beginners.

 

Minor

 

  • Learn Chinese language from a native and professional Chinese teacher
  • Give your mind a workout with Chinese Chess, Mahjong, Go and other games
  • Watch Chinese movies to learn Chinese language and culture.
  • At Win-Win Kung Fu we will try our best to bring you a fun and fruitful summer.

 

All kids aged between 6 and 15 years are encouraged to participate in this summer camp. Registration is free for Win-Win students and additional family members receive a 10% discount of weekly tuition.

 

 

 

Monday to Friday, 8:30 a. m. to 4:30 p.m., with optional extended times until 5:30 p.m.

We are offering 4 week sessions beginning on

 

Week 1. July 26 – 30, 2021

Week 2. August 2 - 6, 2021

Week 3. August 9 - 13, 2021

Week 4. August 16 - 20, 2021

 

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Pittsburgh Pirates sign Taiwanese pitching prospect Po-Yu Chen (陳柏毓).

The Pittsburgh Pirates have signed 19-year-old pitcher Po-Yu Chen (陳柏毓) out of Taoyuan, Taiwan.
The Pirates set their sights on Chen, viewing him as equivalent to a second-round-type talent in the MLB Draft, but needed to obtain more international bonus pool space to sign him. So on Sept. 20, the last day to make such trades, they sent left-hander Domingo Robles to the Cardinals and right-hander Conner Loeprich to the Orioles, acquiring bonus pool slots in each deal.

[General Manager] Cherington said the Pirates have been scouting Chen for three years, writing up more than 25 reports on him.

“In particular, our scout in Taiwan, Fu Chun Chiang, did a great job getting to know Po-Yu and his family and putting us in a position to sign him,” Cherington said. “I enjoyed meeting Po-Yu this week in Pittsburgh, and we look forward to working with him in the years to come.
Chen received a $1.25 million signing bonus, according to the team's beat writer. The Pirates signed one other Taiwanese player in 2019-2020: 17-year old Cheng Tsung-Che (鄭宗哲).

Thursday, October 1, 2020

Throwback Thursday: Chan-ho Park sets record for most wins in Major League Baseball by an Asian pitcher while member of the Pirates.


via Yonhap News.

In August 4, 2010 the last-place Pittsburgh Pirates claimed 37-year-old pitcher Chan-ho Park (박찬호) off waivers, making him the first Korean player in Pittsburgh Pirates history. The Pirates have had Korean players in their system dating back to the late-1990s, and had relief pitcher Byung-hyun Kim in spring training in 2008, but did not have a Korean player on the Major League roster until Park (and would not have another one until, or after, Jung-ho Kang). Park would appear in 26 games for Pittsburgh that year and, on October 1, set the record for most Major League Baseball wins by an Asian pitcher. He would pitch one year in Japan and another year in Korea after leaving Pittsburgh.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Profile on Japanese-American Pirates prospect Daniel Ross.



Millersville University's The Snapper profiles pitcher Daniel Ross, a senior for the Marauders and a 39th-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2019.
Ross was excited to be here in Pennsylvania around his family, but it was also important that coach Jon Shehan sold him on the program. The toughest adjustment, however, was that he was from Japan and there were some major language barriers.

“There was a lot of language barriers and cultural barriers that didn’t click in immediately, but the language barrier kept me away from knowing people more and it was harder to understand people more,” Ross said.

Ross was concerned that the fact that he was still learning English might be a challenge or make it harder to get along with his teammates. But his language barrier wasn’t just holding him back off the field, it created on the field challenges as well. There are things about baseball that are universal, but Ross says in Japan players think differently.

“It’s a little bit different like how people think, baseball was a little differently. I don’t have any quick examples, but everything didn’t make sense or click for me right away,” Ross says.

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Pirates again without an Asian player after Wang becomes free agent.



In not-so-news from earlier this month, the Pirates granted Taiwanese pitcher Wei-chung Wang (王維中) free agency on November 4, leaving them again without an Asian player on their roster. Wang joined the team on August 31 as the first Taiwanese player in Pittsburgh Pirates history and made five appearances toward the end of the season. He was the sixth Asian player to appear in a regular-season game for Pittsburgh, following Jung-ho Kang, Akinori Iwamura, Hisanori Takahashi, Chan-ho Park, and Masumi Kuwata.

The Pirates still have a number of Asian players in their system, including Taiwanese infield prospect Cheng Tsung-Che (鄭宗哲) and Korean shortstop Ji-hwan Bae, who is currently ranked the #8 prospect in the team's system.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Wei-chung Wang (王維中) becomes first Taiwanese player in Pittsburgh Pirates history.



Wei-chung Wang (王維中), claimed from the Oakland Athletics on August 31, became the first Taiwanese player in Pittsburgh Pirates history by pitching in---and winning---last night's game. Wang was originally signed by Pittsburgh in 2011 but was claimed by Milwaukee in the 2014 Rule 5 draft.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Pittsburgh Pirates claim Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Chung Wang (王維中), place him on Major League roster.



The Pittsburgh Pirates claimed Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Chung Wang off waivers from Oakland and have placed him on the 40-man roster. Wang was originally in the Pirates system before being claimed by Milwaukee in the Rule Five draft prior to the 2014 season. If he plays for the Major League team he will be the first Taiwanese player in Pittsburgh Pirates history.

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Back when Hyomin came to Pittsburgh.


via 뉴스엔.

A flashback to when T-ara's Hyomin was in Pittsburgh to throw out the first pitch at PNC Park on September 13, 2015. Jung-ho Kang, her catcher for the pitch, was officially released from the Pirates this week, ending the city's brief flirtation with Korean celebrity.


via 일간스포츠.

Thursday, July 25, 2019

킹캉.



Teacher trainees from Korea National University of Education (한국교원대학교) in Cheongju attended the July 23 Pittsburgh Pirates game and met infielder Jung-ho Kang during warm-ups. The cohort of 43 teachers attending a month-long training program at the University of Pittsburgh's English Language Institute this summer.

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Pittsburgh Pirates sign 17-year-old Taiwanese shortstop Cheng Tsung-Che / Zheng Zong-Zhe (鄭宗哲)



On July 9 the Pittsburgh Pirates signed 17-year-old Taiwanese shortstop Cheng Tsung-Che (鄭宗哲). The contract is reported to be around US $300,000. He is the 10th Taiwanese player to sign with Pittsburgh, and the first since 2014. (Initial reports were using a different Romanization system, which provided an alternate English spelling of his name.)